Happy National Oatmeal Month!

Love Your Heart With Oats

Photo Credit: Chef Cooke via Compfight cc

The oats found in oatmeal are a rich source of beta-glucans which provide a source of dietary fiber to the body. The beta-glucans found in oats and other grains such as barley and rye contain soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber has been shown to lower cholesterol levels and can also regulate blood glucose levels due to the way it is digested in the body. The insoluble fiber helps keep your bowel movements regular! Beta-glucans have also been claimed to boost immunity.

 

5 Tips for Getting the Grains:

  1. Add oats to a cookie or muffin recipe.
  2. Include barely in soups and stews.
  3. Swap sprouted barely bread for other sandwich breads.
  4. Hide oats in your turkey meatloaf.
  5. Start your day with hot oat bran cereal and slivered almonds.
Photo Credit: just_jeanette via Compfight cc

Recipes to Rave About:

5 Tips for Welcoming Herbivores to the Holiday Feast

From vegetarians to vegans and pescatarians to gluten-free, throwing a holiday feast can be quite challenging. If you are planning to host a dinner party this holiday season, rest assured, entertaining guests with multiple food sensitivities does not mean you need to toss out traditional or favorite Holiday foods. With a few modifications, many foods can be easily modified.  What should you do when welcoming herbivores to your holiday feast? We’re dishing out 5 tips you need to do and know before you start cooking this holiday season.

1. Confirm Your Guests’ Dietary Restrictions – First things first, before you start purchasing any ingredients find our what type of food preferences your guests have and if they have any allergies. Keep in mind that not everyone has the same food preferences. Some people will eat dairy but not eggs and vice versa. Knowing your guests’ food styles won’t just help you plan out what dishes you can serve, but it will ensure there is something at the table for everyone.

2. Always Serve A Main Vegetarian Dish – If you pass on confirming your guests’ dietary preferences, steer on the safe side by preparing a main vegetarian dish. This way, anyone who passes up the turkey or other main meat dish will still have something just as delicious and satiating as the latter. For large crowds, a dish like vegetarian lasagna can be appetizing for both non-meat and meat eaters alike.

3.  Make Your Side Dishes Veggie-Friendly – Make sure there are side dishes that everyone can enjoy. While you don’t have to dish out a whole chicken, turkey fish or tofurkey to meet all of your guests’ dietary preferences, side dishes are where you can make something suitable for everyone’s palates and preferences. To do this, keep an open mind by serving dishes other than a simple salad. Some side dishes can include sliced fresh fruits, cheeses, crackers, bruschetta, Brussels sprouts, cranberry sauce, deviled eggs, potato salad, roasted cauliflower, chickpeas, lentils, latkes, corn on the cob, cornbread, stuffed mushrooms, quinoa salad, garlicky kale or spinach.

4. Encourage Your Guests to Bring a Dish – After you letting your guests know in advance that you will be preparing vegetarian/vegan dishes, offer to let them bring a couple of dishes that they enjoy too. If you feel like you’re scrambling to find enough vegetarian/vegan dishes, allow your guests to bring dishes to share with everyone.

Photo Credit: Sugar Daze via Compfight cc

5. Prepare Two Dessert Options – When dishing out dessert, consider eggs and dairy products. If possible, it’s best to prepare one non-dairy dessert option. If you plan to make the dessert yourself, there are a ton of substitutions on the market that add flavor and moisture to your baked goods. For egg substitutes, you can try applesauce, chia seeds in gel form, or EnerG Egg Replacer, which can be found at a health foods store or Whole Foods Market. To substitute cow’s milk, you can use soy, almond or hemp milk and vegetable margarine in many baked goods. For those who are new to creating sweet concoctions without dairy and eggs, know that it is possible to serve a scrumptious vegan dessert!

 

Have you ever hosted a vegetarian or vegan dinner? What tips would you give to new hosts?

Halloween Recipe Round-Up

With Halloween less than 2 weeks away, we’ve been searching for some festive recipes and activities to get into the spirit. Luckily there are tons of fun ideas on the internet! Here’s a few that we especially enjoyed:

Banana Ghosts from Weelicious

All you need for this festive snack is some bananas, chocolate chips, and/or raisins! They’re super cute and serve as a healthy after school snack. (Psst! Check out their tangerine pumpkins, too.)

Photo Courtesy of Cooking Light

Bittersweet Chocolate Cookies from Cooking Light

This recipe is a bit more labor intensive than the last, but it serves as a great weekend activity to get the family together in the kitchen!

Photo courtesy of Litehouse Herbs

Litehouse Foods’ Spiced Pumpkin Cupcakes from Litehouse Foods

Have a cupcake decorating party and let your kids decorate their pumpkin cupcakes with Halloween themes! This pumpkin spice cupcake recipe from Litehouse Foods makes a great addition to a Halloween party.

For more great ideas, check out CNN’s guide to Healthy Halloween Recipes by clicking here.

When To Eat Dinner During Sports Season

Real Mom Question: As afterschool activities start up again, when should I feed my kids dinner—4:30 or 8:30?

Real Mom Answer: Serve dinner before 4:30, prior to their evening activity, and a mini-meal when they get home.

 

How do we feed our kids when extracurricular activities like team practices and athletic schedules get in the way?

First and foremost, just do your best! Meals do not have to taste or be perfect. If you can get your children to eat real, wholesome kinds of food at dinner and throughout the day, then you’re already ahead of the game.

Try serving dinner immediately after school, perhaps around 3:30, which will enable your child to digest what they’ve eaten before running around. An early dinner is a great way to fuel your child for whatever activity awaits them, and if they’re hungry afterward, you can then serve a smaller, “mini meal” following their practice or game—presumably sometime around 8:30.

If possible, consider serving a full family dinner to all of your children at the same time, even if it’s earlier in the evening. Not only will doing so help to foster the importance of eating family meals together, but it’ll also save you time in the kitchen and eliminate the need for multiple meals.

If your children are on different schedules, don’t fret. Again, do your best. Think about each child’s individual nutritional needs and which nutrients are most important for them to consume. A couple of ways to ensure that your children acquire the appropriate nutrients are:

1.    Start early. Make sure to include wholesome ingredients at dinnertime just in case your child is too tired after working up a sweat or wants to join the rest of the team for victory ice cream.

2.    The big picture. Think back to what your child has eaten all day. Did their menu include wholesome grains, leaner proteins and healthier fats? If not, try to incorporate any missing elements in to dinner or their mini meal. If that’s too difficult, it’s not a big deal. Simple squeeze it in to tomorrow’s menu.

3.    Plan ahead. Make meals ahead of time. You can even pack a thermos filled with hearty one-pot dishes or serve up quick frozen meals that you’ve prepared in advance, that way, you don’t have to think too much in the heat of the moment. (For inspiration, check out my “Make-Ahead Meals” and options for vegetarians that can be whipped up in 15 minutes or less on Modern Moms.)

If your child is hungry for a post-game snack, then a quick mini meal should suffice. Remember, bedtime isn’t far off, so use this time to help your child refuel following vigorous activity and be considerate of portions. One option is to make a homemade smoothie. My boys love a berry smoothie I adapted from Driscoll’s Berries, but if you decide to blend up your own, be sure to add a protein source and eliminate any extra sugar the recipe calls for. Other quick and tasty choices are a bowl of soup, which is both filling and hydrating, or whole-grain cereal (like muesli) with Greek yogurt and fruit.

Last but not least, be mindful of your own diets too on these especially busy evenings. Whatever you do, try not to fall prey to the fast food joints that tempt you from the side of the road while driving the kiddies to and from practice. Instead, bring food from home along with you, even it means eating another sandwich or missing a family meal, and remind yourself that none of those greasy ingredients will truly provide you with the power you need to be the super mom that you are.

Likable Lunches: Citibabes' Style

Need nutritious ideas for likable lunches? Here are some flavor favorites you can add to your child’s springtime lunch box: remember exposure to new flavors and textures are key to increasing your child’s nutritional repertoire.

If you have a picky eater, introduce one new flavor with other favorite lunch foods.

* Whole-wheat wrap with thinly sliced fresh roast beef with thin layer of olive tapenade and an apple.

* Sushi bowl: Rice in a bowl with edamame, baked terrakyi tofu cubes, fresh corn and side of pickled ginger or cucumber slices.

* Whole grain sandwich with Cheddar, hummus, grilled red peppers, spring lettuce on whole grain bread with side of mini heirloom tomatoes.

 

To read more on likable lunches head over to Citibabes to read the rest of Laura’s article by clicking here.

A Look Back On 2013

2014 is officially here and we are very excited about all the possibilities and events to come this year! As we prepare ourselves for exciting opportunities, we wanted to take a look back at the posts from 2013. We’ve compiled a Table of Contents of sorts to highlight the MDIO blog posts of the past year. As you search through the list we want to wish the MDIO readers a healthy and happy New Year!

Mom Dishes It Out Posts of 2013 

Photo Credit: David Douša via Compfight cc

JANUARY

This Mom’s Advice on Navigating Advice During Pregnancy

Baked Crispy Chicken Nuggets

The Imperfect Food Mom

Lemon-Caper Salmon with Greek Yogurt

Keep Your Family Moving…Yoga and More

Zucchini “Pasta” with Shrimp and Cherry Tomatoes

Snack: It’s Not A Five-Letter Word

FEBRUARY

Apple Cinnamon Quinoa Breakfast Bowl

A Mommy Blogger’s Muncheon

Eggs & Spinach Quiche Cups

Food Likes and Dislikes… a tough problem to lick!

Red Velvet Cake Bites with Fresh Raspberries

A Cup of Self-Love

Oven Roasted French Fries

If You Give a Cat a Cupcake

Beef and Quinoa Meatballs

Feeding your Kids from a Dad’s Perspective

MARCH 

Roasted Rainbow Veggies

Take the Legume Challenge!

Homemade Hummus

My Family’s Jeans and Genes

Almond Biscotti

Did the Baked Ziti Bomb or Was it a Success?

Crispy Kale Chips

Basic Cooking Skills Every Mom Needs to Know

APRIL

Quinoa with Sautéed Mushrooms and Kale

100 Is the Loneliest Number

Tabbouleh Recipe

Are There Any Normal Eaters Out There?

Beet Hash with Eggs

Is Your Tween Hiding Her Lunch?

Chopped Salmon over Shaved Brussels Sprouts

Eating Un-favorite Foods

Gluten-Free Lemon Meringue Pie

MAY

Adam’s Gluten-Free Surprise, Helping Others Understand Gluten-Free

Vegan Blueberry-Banana Muffins

Teaching Nutrition in School

Whole Wheat Pasta Primavera

How Much is Enough?

Marinated Eggplant

Healthy Summer (Mama Q) BBQ Menu

Fresh Salmon-Cilantro Burgers & Grilled Peaches with Amaretto-Pecan Caramel Sauce

What a NYC Mom and Registered Dietitian Feeds Her Kids

JUNE 

Orecchiette with Roasted Pepper, Arugula, and Tomatoes

The Mommy Manual Series Debut!

Lemon & Olive Oil Polenta Cake

Laura’s Life Lessons Taught by Her Boys – One day at a time

Whole-Wheat Orzo with Mushrooms and Onions

Ice Cream…for Breakfast!

Summer Cucumber Salad

Walking with Purpose

JULY 

Seared Salmon with Brown Rice and Greens

A Child’s Right to Say “No Thank You!”

Banana Walnut Yogurt Parfait

There Are No Good Foods or Bad Foods

Nectarine Arugula Salad

Cheeseburgers in Paradise…a tale of cheeseburgers, breadburgers and Bobby

Omelet with Summer Veggies

Mexican Menu… going “South of the Border” for dinner

Vietnamese Summer Rolls

Top Ten Tips for Pre-Feeding Warm Ups

AUGUST 

Summer Vegetable Soup

MDIO’s Easy Peas-y Tips for First Solid Foods

Cactus Flower Omelet

What’s in this Mom and RD’s Freezer?

Chicken and Couscous Salad

Managing a Full Plate: A Texas Mom’s Thoughts on Health

Eggplant Parm

Tips For Feeding Children with Special Needs

Back to School Snack Ideas

SEPTEMBER 

Rosh Hashanah Roasted Apples

Mindfully Enjoying, and Eating, Your Way Through the Holiday Season…One Holiday at a Time!

Tuna Salad – Three Ways

Get Ready to Bake a New Kind of Cake

Spinach and Leek Frittata

Food Lessons

White Bean and Caramelized Onion Salad

Understanding the USDA’s Smart Snack Rules

Lemon Cake

Irish Colcannon with Kale

OCTOBER

Cuisine Kit Tutorial

Festively Fall Butternut Squash Pizza

Healthy Weekends in Woodstock, VT

Pumpkin Seeds x 3!

Making Fun of the RD’s Children’s Food

Veggie Chili with Butternut Squash

Cookie Comparison: Which Cookie Should You Feed Your Children?

Healthy Halloween Ideas

Wild Rice Burgers

NOVEMBER 

Homemade Apple Butter

What Kind of Candy Mom are You?

Zucchini Bread with a Twist

An Inconvenient Life

Healthy Quinoa and Mushroom Stuffing

Children’s Multivitamins: How To Choose?

Cauliflower “Potato” Latkes

DECEMBER 

Leftover Turkey Soup

The Picky Eater Chronicles

Scheherazade Casserole

What’s In This RD’s Kitchen Cabinet?

PB&J Cookies

Should Kids Be Allowed to Sit at the Adult Table?

Diabetes-Friendly Roasted Veggie Mac & Cheese

Proud to Be A Mama Gift Giving

Spiced Carrot & Apple Mini Muffins

Cuisine Kit Tutorial and Giveaway

Last week we shared with you a recipe, White Bean and Caramelized Onion Salad, and this week we wanted to share with you our how-to video. So, if you haven’t dished out this recipe already, click on the photo below to follow along and try your hand at making this warm and savory salad! And if you’re wondering how I got through this recipe without tearing up from onion chopping, click here to find out how I learned how to cut an onion without crying. Lastly, for a chance to win your very own Cuisine Kit, see below for full details.

This recipe comes from Counter Culture Cuisine, which offers a series of cooking kits that allows you to combine organic (and shelf-stable) essential ingredients with easy recipes for you to choose and cook at your leisure. In each kit, there is a mini pamphlet of recipes. The red text indicates ingredients that are already included in the cooking kit and the black text is anything that you have to purchase on your own. With this little guide, shopping at your local farmers’ market, or health foods store can be a litter easier to navigate the shopping aisles.

 

 

If you have trouble viewing the video tutorial, please click here to play.

 

Enter to win your own healthy cuisine cooking kit!

Thanks to Counter Culture Cuisine, we’re able to give a lucky reader a cuisine set! To enter, see details below:

**You MUST be a subscriber to enter
You can submit more than one entry by doing any of the following. Just be sure to leave an additional comment letting us know you did! Good luck!

Leave a comment here and “Like us” on our Facebook page

Follow @MomDishesItOut and tweet @MomDishesItOut and healthy cooking kit #giveaway!

Giveaway ends on Sunday, October 13th at 6:00 PM EST.

Need Back To School Snack Ideas?

Happy Labor Day Weekend! Watch Laura and her boys dish out yummy recipes and gardening ideas while you relax on the train, bus or plane en route to your weekend away. Anyone hungry?

What Would Julieanna Do? – Healthy Kids: To view, click on the image below.

If you have trouble viewing it, click here!

Enter to Win Peter Bereley's Cookbook and Solae Prize Pack

Last month, Solae–leading company in developing soy based foods like soy milk and energy bars–hosted a dinner created by Chef Peter Bereley. Peter Bereley, author of The Flexitarian Table, prepared a 4 course dinner with every dish containing tofu. Unlike the typical tofu you might imagine, Chef Bereley used it in innovating and delicious ways: tofu-ricotta,miso salad dressing, chili, and even pie for dessert! As he demonstrated how he prepared each dish, he provided creative tips on how to incorporate soy protein to our meals.  At the end of the event, Solae provided us with an awesome giveaway, including an extra for our readers! Included in the awesome backpack are several of Solae’s soy based products and a copy of Chef Bereley’s cookbook so you can try his “soy-licious” recipes on your own!

Thanks to Solae and Peter Bereley, Mom Dishes It Out will be giving away a “Solae Prize Pack”:

· A copy of Peter Bereley’s  “The Flexitarian Table”

· Solae Backpack

· Reusable Water bottle

· Cooking Tools

· A few coupons and samples of Solae’s soy-based products like Balance Bar, 8th Continent Soy Milk, and Special K protein shakes

 

GIVEAWAY DETAILS:

Enter by one of the following ways. You can submit more than one entry by doing any of the following. Just be sure to leave an additional comment letting us know you did! Good luck!

Winners will be announced on Friday, November 16, 2012 at 6:00 PM EST.

MDIO Answers Questions About Feeding Her Boys

Last week, Mom Dishes It Out appeared on the set of Veria TV‘s “What Would Julieanna Do?” In an interview conducted over do-it-yourself granola bars, chia seed pudding and plant potting, MDIO Answers Questions About Feeding Her Boys.

 1. As a Mom, what is the hardest part of getting your kids to eat healthy?

Not being the nutrition gatekeeper of our children’s food is a challenge all moms face. Camp, school and the playground expose my boys to chewing gum, drinking sports drinks and eating low nutrition foods such as crackers and candy during snack time.

As any mom may know, feeding our children can be trying. I created Mom Dishes It Out, a blog for moms to learn from my personal experience in feeding my boys and a place where they can share their experiences and ask questions.

2. How do you explain eating healthy in a context that they understand?
There are everyday foods that we eat to grow, run and think. We need to eat these foods every day. Then there are “sometimes food”—food that we can eat some of the time.  Since the foods are low in nutrition and aren’t the best for growing, they are not considered everyday food.

3. Do you have any tricks to get your kids to eat healthy?
One sure way is to stock the house with only healthy food. I allow all foods but I don’t necessarily have them in the house on a regular basis.

4 Tricks To Getting Kids To Eat Healthy
1. Stock the house with healthy everyday foods
2. Limit boxed or in the pantry packaged food items to three or less
3. Allow all foods but focus on the need for everyday foods
4. Don’t make a big deal about healthy food – offer and expose but don’t overemphasize

 

4. What two kid-friendly recipes did you bring to share today?
Good-For-You Granola Bars – It can be quite challenging to find a granola bar that is nutrient dense, low in added sugar and will not melt in the heat.

My youngest son is a vegetarian so getting omega-3 fatty acids and even omega-6 fatty acids are a challenge. Adding chia seeds to any recipe is a sure way to get vegetarians eating omega-6’s. I give Liam an omega-3 fatty acid liquid supplement to get the beneficial fatty acids only found in fish.

5.  How often do you cook with your kids?
I try to cook with my kids as often as possible and in every little way. Perhaps they do something simple like adding wheat germ to their yogurt, cracking the eggs into their pancake mixture or adding berries into their smoothies.

6. What sorts of foods do your kids crave?
My oldest son loves pancakes with chocolate chips and macaroni and cheese (the chips are dark chocolate and the pancakes are whole wheat or kamut; the pasta is usually whole wheat), while my youngest son favors yogurt, hummus and pretzels (made from spelt or whole wheat).

7. What are your go-to snacks for your kids?
I always offer a carbohydrate with a fat or a carbohydrate with a protein. Then I’ll offer homemade smoothies with fresh and frozen fruits and chia seeds, fruit slices or fruit squeezers with Greek yogurt or cheese

8. Do you guys ever have a cheat day, or treats for special occasions?
I have told my boys time and time again, food is not a treat. A helicopter ride around the city is a treat or a day of bowling is a treat. Food is food. We enjoy ice cream with gummy bears, drink Gatorade and eat cookies some of the time, but not all of the time. Since it is critical that we meet all of our nutrition needs, it is important for parents not to put certain foods on a pedestal, because this will become the food your child will then want.